Lab Safety… it’s no Accident

Today we’ll be going over some important information about your safety in a Lab setting. After review the Lab Safety rules (check the documents page for your specific class for a PDF version), take a look at the image below. See if you can spot some incidences of failing to follow lab procedures for safety.

Reminder there will be a “Common Sense” Lab Safety Quiz tomorrow for Biology

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Common Assessment #1

Step 1: iOS 7 – Bring up the toolbar from the bottom of your screen and TURN ON your DO NOT DISTURB Button

iOS 6 – Go to your settings and TURN OFF notifications or TURN ON do not disturb.

Step 2: If there are people sitting behind you facing you, set your iPad flat on your table; otherwise set your iPad up so that it faces you. Make sure your screen is bright enough to see from this angle.

Step 3: Click the link below and begin your Fall 2016 Common Assessment

Fall 2016 Common Assessment – Google Form

Step 4: Please fill out honest the Student Feedback Form so that I can improve my teaching (or keep doing what I’m doing)

Student Feedback Form: Quarter 1 – Google Form

Step 5: Work on something Academic for the remainder of the time allotted.

Organic Compounds & Carbohydrates!

Not quite how I pictured God looking but ok.

Okay, I know it doesn’t necessarily sound exciting… but keep in mind that organic compounds are what you and I and every living thing on the planet are made of! Kind of cool when you think about it… maybe it’s like God’s ingredients for life!

Anyways, today I’m going to introduce you to the idea of what an organic compound is, then we’ll cover the types, and finally spend some time going in depth into one of the most important organic compounds: Carbohydrates!

Carbs are pretty amazing in that its our body’s primary source of good clean energy. You’ll learn a lot more about them when you watch my video below. And speaking of… I would like for you to take notes on these topics using my youtube video which you can find at the bottom of this post. You should get a paper version of the notes or you can download a pdf version for notability by clicking this link. Either way, I hope you have a new appreciation for organic compounds soon! Bon Appetit!

Lab Safety… it’s no Accident

Today we’ll be going over some important information about your safety in a Lab setting. After review the Lab Safety rules (check the documents page for your specific class for a PDF version), take a look at the image below. See if you can spot some incidences of failing to follow lab procedures for safety.

Reminder there will be a “Common Sense” Lab Safety Quiz!

Lab Safety… it’s no Accident

Yesterday we went over some important information about your safety in a Lab setting. After review the Lab Safety rules (check the documents page for your specific class for a PDF version), take a look at the image below. See if you can spot some incidences of failing to follow lab procedures for safety.

Reminder there will be a “Common Sense” Lab Safety Quiz and you must pass with 100% before being allowed to use the lab.

Also! You must have a signed Lab Safety Contract turned into Mr. Kubuske by Friday to be allowed to use the lab.

Plans for Thursday 8-28

Sorry I can’t be there 1st or 2nd period. To the left is a picture of what I’ll be doing today…

below are the directions on what you’ll be doing today:

Biology:

  1. Take notes on the first section of Unit 2, Basic Chemistry. Their is a YouTube video to watch or the PPT slides. Either way please take the notes and have them ready for class tomorrow.
  2. When you finish the notes, complete the worksheet on the back of the notes. It is NOT homework, but it is a good review. If you get stumped on a blank, read a sentence ahead and see if you can figure it out. You can always ask a person nearby for help too.
  3. I’ll be back later today and have your tests graded and posted
  4. See you on Friday. If you need anything else email me jkubuske@gocathedral.com

SEHS:

  1. Your goal should be to try to have all 6 of the assessment statements for 6.1 done today. Lets try to get back into the routine of working and start to get ourselves back on track.

Lab Safety… it’s no Accident

Today we’ll be going over some important information about your safety in a Lab setting. After review the Lab Safety rules (check the documents page for your specific class for a PDF version), take a look at the image below. See if you can spot some incidences of failing to follow lab procedures for safety.

Reminder there will be a “Common Sense” Lab Safety Quiz tomorrow and you must pass with 100% before being allowed to use the lab.

Also! You must have a signed Lab Safety Contract turned into Mr. Kubuske by Wednesday to be allowed to use the lab.

VSEPR Theory ’14

Now that we know how to find the general structure of a molecule using Lewis Dot diagrams, we can actually find the three-dimensional shape of a molecule AND BUILD IT! We can find the shapes of molecules using the VSEPR (Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion) Theory.

The idea is that atoms and electrons found around a central atom are repelled by each other because of the negative charges of the electrons surrounding each (remember opposites attract +/- and similar charges repel -/- or +/+). In other words, everything bonded or attached to the central atom wants to be as far away from everyone else as possible.

So let’s look at NH3 for example.

Step 1: Calculate the valence electrons

1 x N = 1 x 5 = 5
3 x H = 3 x 1 = 3       5+3 = 8 ve

Step 2: Draw the Lewis Dot Structure

Step 3: Calculate the ABE type

Each letter of ABE stands for a part of the molecule
A= A central atom. If it has a central atom, write an A
B= Attached atoms. Count the number of atoms attached to the central atom and write that as a subscript of B example: B3
E= Free Electron Pairs. If their are extra electron pairs on the central atoms we count them as pairs and write that as a subscript of E (if there are no pairs, do not write E. If there’s only 1 pair, just write E) example: E2

NH3 has a central atom, three attached atoms, and 1 electron pair. So the ABE structure would be AB3E

Step 4: Find the Ideal Geometry.

I like to think of the ideal geometry as places on the central atom with thing happening. If there is only 2 places where things are happening (attached atoms or free electrons) then it’s Linear. If there’s three places, it’s Trigonal. If there’s four, it’s Tetrahedral.

Below is a great link to a video explaining the different shapes and where they come from.

Since NH3 is an AB3E structure there are 4 places where things are happening (B 3 + 1 E) so NH3 is Tetrahedral.

Step 5: Molecular Shape.

NH3

Along with the ABE chart is the list of Ideal Geometry and Molecular shape. The shape is based on the idea that the other atoms want to be as far apart as possible AND that free electron pairs need a lot of space to roam.

NH3 has 1 free pair of electrons that float to the top of the molecule as if they were in a balloon. The three Hydrogens then act as a tripod for the entire molecule holding it up. Therefore we say the shape of NH3 is pyramidal.

Now that you have completed the simple VSEPR diagrams and made your models of Linear, Trigonal, and Tetrahedral molecular geometry… it’s time to break the rules…

The rule we’re breaking is the Octet rule. To this point you have limited the central atom to sharing up to 8 electrons. But, If your Lewis Dot Diagram has too few electrons, you add pairs of electrons to the central atom.

XeF2

Let me show you what I mean. Let’s say that we have XeF2.If you calculate the valence electrons you should have 22.
But when you make the Lewis Dot Diagram, it only has 20 ve.

So, we add a pair of electrons to the Xe central atom giving us a total of 22 veXeF22This creates a new Ideal Geometry known as Triangular Bipyramidal, which means it has placement for 5 parts (attached atoms or free electron pairs) around the central atom.

TriangularBipyramidalLike Tetrahedrons, we are working now in 3-dimensions instead of 2.

There is also an Ideal Geometry for 6 parts known as Octahedron. Think of the central atom as a 6 -sided die. So atoms can be bonded in 6 places and in 3-dimensions!

Octahedron